6.06.2010

CHICKEN POX


I immunize my kids begrudgingly. I say "begrudgingly" because I can see the pros and cons of both sides. My hippie mom didn't immunize me until I entered college and I survived. However, for some reason, I just feel like it's the right thing for my family. So,I give my kids alll the immunizations except for one -

CHICKEN POX

Why?

Because it sounds stupid.

No, I have not done any research. Yes, I realize that my reasoning is idiotic. It's just that every time the doctor asks me if I want to give one of my kids the chicken pox shot, I think about when I had the chicken pox. What's so bad about having the chicken pox? It was a rite of passage! I got to stay home from school for a week and watch television. Awesome childhood memories.

While we were in D.C. last week, my sister-in-law, Else, who was watching Charlie, called to tell me that she thought her daughter had chicken pox. "Really?" I said, "Oh, I hope you're right. That would be great!" Unfortunately, she didn't have the chicken pox, which is a real bummer because now I'm worried my kids might get it as adults and die from it. Then I am going to feel really bad about writing this post.

Sorry, kids.

9 comments:

  1. Yeah, that sucks for them, especially since mos kids are immunized now they have less chance of getting it as a kid and frekishly they'll get it as an adult or something and have ideous scars all over their bodies and almost die from it, but hey, we allgot our own choices to make......m I being too dramatic?

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  2. p.s. can you tell my keyboard does not work right?

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  3. Thanks, Emily, maybe you're right. Now I'm feeling like a jerk. :) Maybe I should get them the shot.

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  4. Oops, didn't mean to make you feel like a jerk, it's not your fault they came out with the chicken pox vaccine, chicken pox used to be a right of passage in childhood, although, I guess it's good for old people, not so many kids have it anymore so old people have less of a chance of getting it and dying from it.

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  5. My mum had chicken pox at 44 (got it from me, I was 15, and had caught it from my sister, who was then 22), and she was perfectly fine! We all were, and way past the "normal" age for chicken pox.
    And you don't know me from anywhere, but I stumbled upon this post from a google search and I thought I'd tell you it's not that dangerous at all :)

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  6. Um, maybe do some more research before telling others it is not dangerous at all...your personal experience is great for you, but tell that to others who had bad experiences with it....

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  7. Here is just one of many sources ...
    In adults, the disease is more severe,[27] though the incidence is much less common. Infection in adults is associated with greater morbidity and mortality due to pneumonia,[28] hepatitis, and encephalitis.[citation needed] In particular, up to 10% of pregnant women with chickenpox develop pneumonia, the severity of which increases with onset later in gestation. In England and Wales, 75% of deaths due to chickenpox are in adults.[9] Inflammation of the brain, or encephalitis, can occur in immunocompromised individuals, although the risk is higher with herpes zoster.[29] Necrotizing fasciitis is also a rare complication.[30]

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  8. Hey Cristin, you really need to go to cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd-vac/varicella/ (or just Google "how effective is the chickenpox vaccine?" and it will come right up).

    I'm no expert, but my childhood memories of getting chickenpox aren't so pleasant! I missed my BIG 2nd grade field trip (a really cool one) and I was really miserable. My little sis had the worst case of us all-- I think I counted over 250 pox on her little body! (The CDC calls them "lesions" and has excellent links-- pros and cons, chickenpox parties, etc.) You may want to reconsider-- I mean, what if your kids get them right before leaving for some amazing vacation (or destination wedding... say in the Shenandoah mountains, haha)??

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  9. Immunisation can prevent serious medical problems. For children who have not had chickenpox, the vaccine can help protect them against serious complications associated with the chickenpox illness and from developing shingles in later life. Immunised children who do get chickenpox generally have a much milder form of the disease. They have fewer skin lesions, a lower fever and recover more quickly.

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