4.06.2009

LIAR, LIAR


This conversation has become commonplace most weekday mornings -

Luke: Where's Daddy?

Me: At work.

Luke: He's flying the spaceship?

Me: Yup.

Luke is obviously confusing Erik's weekly flying lessons with his job. The worst part is that I am playing along with this.

I know this is going to backfire on me someday. Just wait, ten years from now Erik will be asked to speak at Luke's school about his many "travels to space" and we'll have to tell Luke the truth. This will cause him to grow up with an inability to trust people, which will lead him to never marry and never hold a job. He'll turn to a life of alcohol and drugs, which will ultimately cause him to be homeless. This will all be because I never corrected him on what his Daddy really does every day when he was 2 years old.

Why is it okay to lie to child about certain things, while other things are wrong? The Santa Claus/Easter Bunny/Tooth Fairy myths are perfect examples of socially acceptable lies which people find cute. Yet, telling a little boy to stop touching his "wee wee" or it will fall off is considered mean and threatening. Speaking of which, I need to get off the computer and go get Luke out of the bathtub.

6 comments:

  1. Ya, I know what you mean. Jonah asks me every day where daddy is too, and I tell him he is at the hospital saving lives. Oh wait thats not a lie. But I guess I'm lying about Jonah asking me. What really happens is Jonah runs to the door and yells DADA! and I say "Daddy's coming home!!!" every if he's really not, because it makes him so happy.

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  2. I have thought about this too. I remember when I first found out Santa Claus wasn't real. I was devastated. Never mind that I didn't put two and two together and realize all the others went with it. I knew the toothfairy wasn't real and the Easter Bunny wasn't real, but I didn't realize Santa didn't exist until I was 10 and my 5th grade teacher blurted it out to the whole class.

    I wonder sometimes if kids learn to lie from us, their parents. That makes me sad.

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  3. That's so funny! And about the wee-wee thing, I think we tell them that it'll fall off is the only thing they can conprehend at that age!
    :~D

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  4. I've never tried the "falling off" trick. Of course, I also told my oldest that Santa wasn't real only because she asked me before I had planned an answer and in the moment, I thought, "You can't lie to your kid..."
    So are you going to explain to everyone what "GOOD FOR YOU GUYS" is referring to? :-)

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  5. Kaitlyn asked me the other day if a bunny really fills their Easter baskets and I just couldn't lie to her! It just sounded so ridiculous to tell her that a BUNNY comes to our house with a bunch of candy and toys. Yet somehow Santa coming down the chimney doesn't... I don't know! Why DO we do it?

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  6. What's interesting to me is that I can remember my parents lying to me as a child about very insignificant things, and yet those are the lies I still remember negatively, not the 7 or 8 years of my life that they lied to me about the important fictional characters that helped make up my childhood... do we think that it is okay to lie to our kids about Santa, Easter Bunny, Leprechauns, etc because it's a socially acceptable lie? Interesting thought, I'm glad you brought this up!

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